i should tell you: laura lee

Well hello there and welcome to volume eighteen of I Should Tell You, where I ask cool musicians questions about food, pretty much to see if they’ll answer me, really, but also because the results are usually interesting as. The same three questions every time, with the likes of Anika Moa, Coco Solid and The Phoenix Foundation giving me their food thoughts – and this time I’m talking to the boo Laura Lee.

Laura Lee is one of those charming babes you might come across in life where you’re all like, “hey babydoll, hey bae, hey honeybee” even though you barely know them, because you just end up falling into that kind of familiarity with them right away. We originally bonded over a bunch of stuff (including using the adjective “dreamburgers” to describe a young Leonardo DiCaprio) and I have been a huge fan of her music in all its iterations. She was part of O’Lovely, whose album Constellations had me swooning from the first moment I heard the single Bright Lights – but now she’s on her own as Laura Lee.

Little Too Late is her first single which she recently released and it’s gorgeous, with that dreamy, sad-yet-upbeat pop vibe that I love. Can’t wait to see what she comes out with next…

Thanks Laura! The interview will start…now.

Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?

I can’t think of anywhere that I like to brag about but there is someone.. When I’ve got some spare time in the day I head down to my local cafe called Sam Barnes, there’s a baker there who I’ve now become friends with (not just for her cakes.)

I went in there one day and asked about their birthday cake options, I explained to her that I don’t have a sweet tooth and she made me a mixed berry cheese cake. It’s one of the best things I’ve ever tasted. I don’t usually get excited about cakes but she’s changed me! She’s truly an artist. Ever since she made me my birthday cake I brag about her to anyone that is needing cakes or catering because her cakes are like nothing I’ve ever tasted. 

What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?

I’m obsessed with popcorn. I started making it everyday after school when I was about 13, at first I think my mum was hoping it was a fad as I’d get home and stink the house out every day, I also like to cook it to the point where it almost starts to burn, at first I didn’t know what I was doing so I burnt a couple of pots…. 

These days I don’t cook it daily but any excuse to make it and I’ll do it. I like to experiment with different flavours. When I was in Melbourne I went through a faze of cooking it in coconut oil with Turmeric and Salt and Pepper. Tonight I made it with honey and salt… I also have to say I’m obsessed with dates, they’re right up there with popcorn!! 

What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?

When ever I see hundreds and thousands it reminds me of being a child, I have flashbacks of going to birthday parties and eating fairy bread. Hundreds and Thousands biscuits have the same affect. They were my favourite  biscuits as a child and probably still are.

The smell of dill is my other strong food-related memories, mum used to put it in rice as it cooked and the whole house would smell amazing. I do it now and then, it’s also tasty cooled with a squeeze of lemon juice mixed though. It makes the rice taste just lovely!
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i should tell you: spook the horses

Well hello there, and welcome to volume seventeen of I Should Tell You, where I ask cool musicians about food to see what they have to say, or indeed, to see if they’ll even answer at all. I haven’t done one of these in a damn while, but yay, it’s back! 

This time around I’m talking with Callum, Zach and Donnie from Wellington band Spook The Horses, whose sound I would describe as “pleasingly grumbly” but is perhaps more helpfully to be described as the sound of “post-hardcore, atmospheric, doom”. Wonderful! If you want to listen to them you could head to their bandcamp site, or you can hear their entire recent album Rainmaker on YouTube. If gruff, dark, moody music that kind of envelopes you and washes over you at the same time when you listen to it really loud tickles your fancy then your fancy will most definitely be tickled by these guys. Look out for them around Wellington as they’re always doing gigs here and there, otherwise just immerse yourself in that blissful doom noise.    

Thanks Callum, Zach and Donnie! The interview begins…now. 
1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?

Callum: I’ve been done the whole degustation and wine-pairing thing at Hippopotamus before which is always good for some bragging but my go-to place in Wellington is Olive. Olive up and down rules. Consistently good coffee, good brunch vibes and the most chill and peaceful outdoor courtyard ever. It’s less of a name-drop and more of a love letter,

Zach: A place that Is always interesting and relaxing to eat at is Duke Carvells. Although I’m not sure if i’ve earned the bragging rights, as the only time I can afford to go there is when my parents are paying. I enjoy eating somewhere that makes as many of the components of the meal as possible on site. I know they do their own breads, and smoked/preserved meats and sausages. They’re all delicious, and are presented in interesting ways.

Donnie: It’s not exactly something to brag about, but I’m a huge, huge fan of pho bò, which is this Vietnamese beef noodle dish, and the best pho I’ve ever had, anywhere, is in this little unassuming fish and chip shop on Bond Street here called the Fisherman’s Plate. It’s one of those places that has burgers, chips, spring rolls all up next to the Vietnamese cuisine, so you’d never guess, but it has some of the best Vietnamese food in the whole city.

2. What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?

Callum: Nachos! Alex and I used to live together and made developed the Spook the Horses classic, Nachos de los Muertos, which is probably terrible Spanish and probably also very culturally insensitive (Sorry.) It’s a chili delivery mechanism above all else. We all love spicy food so the more different kinds of chili the better. Chipotles and green jalapenos are mandatory. Black beans are mandatory. Watties beans are strictly forbidden. What’s not to love about a cauldron of vicious as hell chili?

Zach: My go to solo home cooked meal is probably Putanesca, a pasta dish with a salty and warming tomato sauce. I usually make it because its really quick, and all of the ingredients last for ages – so I always have them lying around. Olives, capers, anchovies, canned tomatoes, etc. Also a lot of people get weirded out about anchovies, so my leftovers never get stolen!

Donnie: I will never, ever pass up the opportunity to make some dope as fuck grilled cheese sandwiches. Love those things. You can chuck anything in them, too. Olives, artichokes, tomatoes, ham, pineapple, corn, mushrooms etc. Two pieces of thick grain bread chucked in a frying pan, buttered sides out, with a ton of cheese in them, and whatever else you’ve got lying around. I think I have to go make one right now.

3. What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?”

Callum: My dad is an excellent cook and a total outdoorsman, so he grows as many of his own veges and herbs as he can. My fondest memories are of how proud he would be to serve something he grew himself, or seeing him duck out of the kitchen to the herb garden to season a dish on the fly. I have some weird memories too, like my mum telling me the chicken I was eating was actually “chicken flavoured dough” to silence my objections about eating animals. Maybe my occasional flirtations with vegetarianism would have stuck if not for that bizarre lie.

Zach: The most vivid memories of food from my childhood would have to be of Christmas and new year’s time with my family. There were a lot of dishes that were traditional to have for our family, but my favourite one is probably the trifle my parents made. I’m not talking supermarket sponge cake and Watties canned peaches. It was all beautifully homemade sponge, custard, syllabub and fresh berries. Also lots and lots of booze. It’s one of those rare times you can get drunk off eating solid food. The other memories that stuck would just be learning about having a healthy diet from my mother. She taught me that you can cook healthily and still have awesome tasting food.


Donnie: My mum is a fucking INCREDIBLE cook. Like, she can walk into any kitchen and just work with what’s there and make a delicious feast for eight people. One dish I was always fiending for was her kedgeree, which is a kind of curried rice dish made with smoked fish. This time when we were camping with a bunch of family friends, she made so much of the stuff for everyone that it filled one of those enormous 50 litre washing tubs. I had like six bowls and still wanted more. I’m pretty sure they had to keep me away by swatting at me with a spatula.

Read previous i should tell you interviews here.

i should tell you: anika moa

Well hello there, and welcome to volume sixteen of I Should Tell You. Where I ask cool musicians some questions about food, just to see if they’ll answer, really. That’s literally how this segment started: I was like, I wonder if I just ask some people to do this…if they might say yes. And then I did lots and lots of fun interviews and then somehow it zoomed from July 2013 to April 2014, like some kind of stretch of time passing where both large eventful things happen but also I low-key procrastinate and am disorganised. Life!

But, I am so pleased to be bringing it back by talking to the talented, comely, and excellent Anika Moa.

I have loved Anika Moa’s music ever since hearing her debut song Youthful in 2001 in the car on the way to a family reunion in Ngaruawahia, and thinking “ugh I relate to this so much” without even really quite knowing what I was listening to. She just keeps getting better and better and if you’re completely unfamiliar with her back catalogue I recommend jumping round like you’re playing elastics on your lunch break at primary school, with gorgeous songs like Mother and Running Through The Fire and Blame It On The Rain and also the song Be Mine that she does as part of AnikaBohHollie which I am so, so obsessed with.

PS: If you’re in the South Island of New Zealand later this month Anika Moa and the rad Julia Deans are doing a lil tourette. Check it out for sure.

Thanks Anika Moa! The interview begins…now.

1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?

I have recently moved back to christchurch so I’m making an effort to go out and make myself known in the restaurant scene. My indulgence is fine dining and a good big fat glass of red! My friends and I had a gorgeous meal out in lyttelton last week. A beautiful little place called Tommy Changs. A space of creativity, a bit of rough and tumble and an intimate setting. Very down on the farm but local beer drinking Russian sailors and what nots. You wouldn’t expect their food to be so.. Well, so good! Pork ribs done in a sticky sauce, chicken laksa so tasty and well seasoned and the wine match is just as good. I enjoyed myself and so did my friends. We all went out and partied like we were 20 again so it must have given us a reason to live. Loved it. 5/5

2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?

I’m a cheese toastie kind of girl! Or cheese on toast or cheese rolls or cheesy pizza. I love cheese (you can tell from my fat ass) If I’m feeling flash I make a gorgeous chicken salad with quinoa and anything I have in my fridge seasoned with salt pepper and soya sauce and lemon. LOVE it.  

3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?


My mum, sister and nana all used to make the best macaroni cheese I’ve ever tasted. They still do so it’s good to be back home. I love the crunchy onions and the crisp bacon. Also fish n chip Friday was pretty neat too. 

i should tell you: The Phoenix Foundation

Well hello there, and welcome to volume fifteen of I Should Tell You, the segment on this blog where I interview cool musicians from that particular genre of ‘those who will reply to my earnest emails’. The same three questions about food every time, just to see what happens. 

Today I am greatly pleased to be talking to nearly every last damn member of The Phoenix Foundation
The Phoenix Foundation are a sparklingly brilliant band from Wellington, whose mellow-yet-stompy music has been delighting ears all over the world since years ago. Should you know nothing of the Phoe-Fou and want in, their jaunty and endearing song Buffalo is a good place to start. I also recommend the dreamy 40 Years with its video directed by local babe Taika Waititi. The fact that the entire band obligingly answered my questions surely demonstrates, if nothing else, how nice they are. Not that niceness is a reason to buy anyone’s records: luckily they back up all this niceness by being bloody great musicians too. I’ve seen them live several times now (“see” being relative. The last time was when they were at Slowboat Records in Wellington and short little me saw naught but the flanks of the man in front of me. And, if I leaned carefully, the top of Luke Buda’s head) and it’s always a swell time with Grade A banter. Should you be overdue to see them again, or feel like the time has come to see them for the first time, why! Today’s your lucky day. They’re back from traversing Europe on the back of their grand new record Fandango and are touring the major centres of this fair (or at least, fair enough) country this month. 
19 July The Bedford @ CPSU, Christchurch
20 July Queens, Dunedin
21 July Chicks Hotel, Dunedin
26 July The Cabana, Napier
27 July James Cabaret, Wellington
Tickets can be sought and bought in Wellington at Rough Peel Music & Slowboat, both around the corner from each other, so you might as well make a small shopping spree of it, and in Christchurch and Dunedin from Cosmic.

Thanks again, Sam Scott, Conrad Wedde, Luke Buda, Will Ricketts, and Chris O’Connor! The interview starts…now. 

Sam Scott:
1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
It’s Chez Panisse in Berkley. Me and my wife were staying with friends in Oakland and a few people had suggested we check it out. Every single thing we ate blew our minds. It was the best service I have ever experienced. We got so carried away by the ambience and perfection of everything that I ended up proposing to my wife half way through the meal, completely unplanned. What I didn’t know at the time was that Chez Panisse was a the forefront of the local food movement. They have their own farms, vineyard etc. They brought us a complementary plate of stone fruit to eat while we finished our wine before desert and it was unquestionably the best I have eaten anywhere. 
2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
If I’m cooking for anyone I will always make an effort. I love to cook for other people. My wife pleads with me to stop being so fancy and make something simple for once (as I tend to make a lot of dishes). If I’m cooking for myself I make no effort at all. Maybe plain spag with olive oil, lots of pepper and cheddar cheese. 
3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
My grandfather lived in Spain and we only got to visit him there once (he came to NZ quite a few times in childhood, he was a cool dude). Pretty much everything we ate in Spain was a revelation, but what stands out to me was the churros sold in the big open air market in Javea. The markets themselves were like a magical kingdom. We certainly didn’t have anything like that in Newtown in 1991, but the churros were just unbelievable. Cooked in a huge cauldron of fat over open flame. I pretty much found every churro since these ones to be nothing but a disappointment. 
Conrad Wedde:
1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
I dont really like to brag about where i’ve eaten and havent been anywhere all that flash. but the food in vietnam is pretty amazing…soup on the street or epic banquets washed down with large bottles of beer, theres a place called cha ca la vong(i think) in Hanoi that does beautiful charcoal tumeric fish, I think the street it’s on is actually named after the restaurant.
2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
rice or soba noodle soup with whatever bits I can find
3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
brown rice with grated cheddar cheese and corn fritters with home made tomato relish
Luke Buda:
 1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
St John’s in London probably, because of its lauded “nose to tail eating”. Though if I’m truly honest with myself I found my food there mildly disappointing.  I had the Bone Marrow which is one of their signature dishes (found it a bit boring) and some duck thing which was a bit dry… Ha! Damning report. But some of the other guys had awesome stuff.  Tom had braised Ox heart. It was AMAZING. Also my dessert was great. Cheesecake with raisins that had been soaked in marsala for over 3 months.
The one that I am a total fan of however, is MORO (also in London). It’s probably as much to do with the fact that I have one of their cookbooks and it’s taught me heaps.  But I also like the fact it’s unpretentious. It’s not really fine dining as such, it’s just amazingly tasty food.  Like the Mansaf, their version of it is:  Saffron yoghurt soup with Lamb meatballs and pine nuts.  Simple.  Delicious.  All the meats are wood roasted or charcoal grilled.  Lot’s of nuts and yoghurt and all spice and cinnamon and sumac blah blah blah etc etc Your plate comes out COVERED in food. Very very good. Highest recommendation from me.
2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
I will almost always head to the Fisherman’s Plate in Bond St, Wellington, for their absolutely excellent Pho. Don’t be fooled by the way the place pretends to be a mere Fish’n’Chip shop!  The noodle soup is world class (this, of course is an absurd thing for me to say as I have never been to Vietnam BUT it’s better than any I had on London’s Kingsland Rd, and I had many, at highly regarded Vietnamese joints, well the Fisherman’s Plate Pho is superior!).
If i’m cooking for myself… well this hardly ever happens anyway, as I have 2 kids. Or at least, not for dinner. I probably make myself a flash brunch or lunch.  Probably crushed roasted new potatoes with a poached egg, or Shakshuka (a current have, from the Ottolenghi book Jerusalem) or just a nice frittata.
3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
Eating an entire giant can of halva. Poland (where I lived until I was 8) is mad on halva! You can buy halva bars in any corner store.  Just as popular as chocolate bars.  Also, whenever my mum would bring home some “serek” (kind of translates as: “cute little cheese”) which is basically fromage frais. It was only occasionally in the shops.  ALSO my uncle going to pick little red berries in the forest and then mushing them up with polish cottage cheese (quite different from the NZ variety, totally dry.  You can slice a slice, it’s crumbly.  Almost like not salty feta, or dry ricotta) then having that on very thinly sliced rye bread in the morning.
Will Ricketts:
1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
i like to brag about a dinner in morocco with ritchie singleton, we ate a whole leg of slow cooked lamb in a sitting. it was unbelievably delicious.
i know that is not a restaurant but cant help despite myself, casually throwing that in when someone mentions a tagine or anything of the morrocan culinary experience.
2. What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
i love to make myself pasta. if i eat out alone in wellington, i am strongly drawn to vietnamese food. my favourites being mekong on vivian st or phong vu in the left bank, to have a rare beef pho.
3. What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
hasn’t changed thankfully! when i go to stay at mums and i get up in the morning to a freshly cleaned kitchen, the sound of choral music and the smell of fresh bread cooling down on the kitchen table. spoilt i know!
Chris O’Connor:
 1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
Jesus Maria in Cordoba province, Argentina. Castrating young bulls and frying up their testes for afternoon tea. During asado for dinner that evening there was a cut – saliva glands I think, that seemed to melt in my mouth…
2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
Honey smeared roast vegetables with couscous.
3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
realizing my thumb tasted rather like chips, and thats why enjoyed sucking it so much.

i should tell you: delaney davidson

Well hello there, and welcome to volume fourteen of I Should Tell You, the show which is actually just a segment on this blog, where I interview cool musicians who will respond to my earnest emails. Only three questions about food, always the same, just to see what happens.

Today I’m delighted to be talking to Delaney Davidson, whose record Sad But True: The Secret History of Country Music Songwriting Volume 1 with Marlon Williams I’ve listened to so many times I could…just listen to it again, really. Simple yet complex, uplifting yet misanthropically dark, brilliant yet really brilliant. If you haven’t heard anything of this yet, I recommend the bar-room jangle of How Lucky You Are, or the moody Bloodletter, which won the APRA Best Country Song of 2013.

He’s currently eating BBQ and playing music in the US, but returns to NZ later this year to tour with the Topp Twins, and will be performing Kurt Weill music at the Christchurch Arts Festival on September 19. Tim and I were fortunate enough to see him with Marlon Williams late last year at Mighty Mighty in Wellington. It was a raucously excellent evening, and had us both saying “how are those vocal sounds coming from just two men?” In a good way, I mean – the sound was amazing, as you will know if you listen to the songs I recommended. Or indeed the entire album.

Thanks Delaney Davidson! The interview starts…now.

 1. Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?

I talk quite a lot about food, so I don’t drop it into conversations, more like the opposite.. I often talk about places I have eaten, but more of a dissection than a brag.. I like to figure out how things are made.. Once on the border of Vietnam and Thailand I went to a deserted market late one night, totally empty and completely dark all the tables were bare under the canopy, there was a little tent with a wok and a lady cooking. No one was round, then a guy appeared out of nowhere, came up and ordered something. I asked for the same.. It was fried eggs on rice.. absolutely killer. a thin sauce of soy and fish sauce with garlic and chilli…so simple.. but one of the best things I ever ate.. 


2 What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?
I often dream about cheese sandwiches. I like it when you eat one then you breath through your nose and you get the taste of fresh bread swirling round inside your nose and palate, I think the cheese sandwich is a great thing to eat as it has massive variations from country to country. Breads vary and cheeses do too.. Crusty fresh loaves from France, Rustico, Paesano..chewy crusty blackened sourdough.. soft asiago, oude gouda, appenzeller, or gruyere.. all worth a good day dream… the secret ingredient to a cheese sandwich is butter.. just a little to stick the cheese down and begin the lubrication… I know its not gluten free or dairy free, but think its in the genes and DNA of humans to chew wheat.. cultivate it, harvest it, grind it, bake it.. Its part of life…

3 What’s one of your favourite food-related memories from your childhood?
Cold roast chicken on a picnic… with grapes. behind a hedge at the zoo.
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i should tell you archives:

Coco Solid (April 19)
Watercolours (March 22)
Jeremy Toy, She’s So Rad (March 14)
Hera and Jed (March 7)
Eva Prowse (March 1)
Jan Hellriegel (February 21)
Dear Time’s Waste (February 14)
Flip Grater (February 7)
Tourettes (January 31)
Anna Coddington (January 24)
PS speaking of fun/strange things I’ve been doing, I’ve been making cakes for my celebrity crushes for Vice magazine. It might work one day! 

i should tell you: Janine and the Mixtape

Well hello there, and welcome to the eleventh i should tell you, where I interview cool musicians who will answer my emails. The same three questions about food, every time, just to see what kicks can be achieved. This time I’m talking to the super duper fly Janine and the Mixtape, who is from New Zealand but has made Brooklyn, NYC, her new home. Lucky thing.

I seriously love this lady, not least because of her aspirational ways with eyeliner. That’s quite a big part of it, really. She has one of the biggest, richest voices you’ll ever hear, but uses it kinda sparingly and carefully and doesn’t bust out the American Idol-style melisma just because, which is what I would do given the same set of pipes. She writes, produces, makes beats, does it all, and what you get is r’n’b with 90s excellence (let’s face it, a lot of 90s r’n’b, even the most drum-machine-keyboardish stuff, is untouchably good) plus a lush yet moody spaciousness. I know that possibly doesn’t make sense but I can’t fight the adjectives that appear when I listen to music, okay?

I adore her song Bullets, but you should really listen to her new single Hold Me, which premiered on Vibe.com, what! It’s way beautiful, and is from her upcoming album Dark Mind. (Love that name.)

Thanks, Janine! (Who signed off her email to me as Janine and the Cookbook, which I thought was pretty cute.) The interview will start…now.

Where’s somewhere you’ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation? 

Haha, so I’m gonna be honest with you. You’ll quite often catch me bragging about “The Cherokee Spot” where I live, in Brooklyn. It’s not exactly classy, but who doesn’t love a breakfast burger and and a Sunny D (Orange Juice thats 5% Juice) for $2.75?

What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?

I love cooking. I’m pretty experimental with whatever I have in the house. I make pretty sweet omelets, any time of the day and night. I also eat a lot of chocolate chip cookies! 

What’s one of your favourite food memories from your childhood? 

Man, that’s pretty tough. Living at home was always amazing for “the pantry” and still is when I go visit! But I’m gonna have to say my favourite memory is when me and my best friend Nikki used to make cooking shows and make mum film it. I can still hear her voice from behind the camera saying, “Janine, don’t do that, stop being silly”…  

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i should tell you archives:

Coco Solid (April 19)
Watercolours (March 22)
Jeremy Toy, She’s So Rad (March 14)
Hera and Jed (March 7)
Eva Prowse (March 1)
Jan Hellriegel (February 21)
Dear Time’s Waste (February 14)
Flip Grater (February 7)
Tourettes (January 31)
Anna Coddington (January 24)

i should tell you: luckless and nadia reid

Well hello there, and welcome to volume twelve of I Should Tell You, where I interview musicians about food. My strict criteria is that I like them and they answer my earnest emails. Same three questions every time, just to see what happens. It’s more or less weekly, but has slowly relaxed down to fortnightly lately, and because I’m a bad person, it didn’t even happen on its scheduled Friday morning this week. Sorry, kids.

This time round I have both Ivy Rossiter of Luckless and Nadia Reid treading the boards, because they’ll be touring the whole damn country together during May, what! It’s New Zealand Music Month, but you get the presents. (Deeply curious about this potluck dinner in Wellington, by the way.)

Nadia Reid and Luckless Tour Dates

Thursday 9 May – The Darkroom, Chch
Friday 10 May – Hilltop Tavern, Little River
Saturday 11 May – Chick’s Hotel, Port Chalmers
Sunday 12 May – New Edinborough Folk Club, Dunedin
Tuesday 14 May – Federal Diner, Wanaka
Wednesday 15 May – Donovan’s Store, Okarito
Thursday 16 May – Barrytown Hall, Barrytown
Friday 17 May – The Boathouse, Nelson
Saturday 18 May – The Tin Hut, Featherston
Monday 20 May – Evil Genius NZ Music Month Potluck Dinner, Wellington
Wednesday 22 May – The Moorings, Wellington
Thursday 23 May – Rhythm Upstairs, New Plymouth
Friday 24 May – The Wine Cellar, Auckland
Saturday 25 May – Funky Fish, Bayly’s Beach
Sunday 26 May – Golden Dawn, Auckland

The music of Luckless and Nadia Reid seems to have a natural affinity, to my naive ears, anyway – both have strong, unique voices and a little delicious dark melancholy going on. Nadia Reid’s EP Letters I Wrote And Never Sent is available to listen to and download free – it’s not very long, so you might as well listen to the whole thing from start to finish, but if you contrarily want to listen out of order, I recommend the gorgeous Young Girl/Mother’s Lying Heart. Luckless, whose name I love, being fairly luckless myself, has a rich, moody sound and dreamy, shadowy music videos – I rather adore the recent release Skin & Bones and 2011’s Hummingbird Heart. 

Thanks, Nadia and Luckless! The interview starts…now.

Nadia Reid


Where’s somewhere you‘ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation?
I’ve talked smack over a pint and a plate of Lyttelton’s Wunderbar Nachoes, I’ve supped on a Courting Rachel cocktail at Darkroom followed by late night drunken cheese & mixed bean toasties made by T’Nealle, I’ve had post breakfast regret at Sweet Mothers Kitchen, such sweet regret, eaten everything off the menu at Coco’s Cantina & wined and dined at New Flavour & Barilla in the city of sails. 

What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own? 
I am all about edamame beans these days, maybe some boiled kumara, goats cheese, avocado, fresh lime, and a poached egg. I like a lunch with an identity crisis. 
What’s one of your favourite food memories from your childhood? 
Eating my mother’s nut loaf every Christmas, drizzled in gravy. I can taste it right now! So comforting. I also have fond memories of the 50c mixtures from the local dairy, eating them in the park, trading off the bad ones and spinning out on sugar. 

Ivy Rossiter of Luckless:

Where’s somewhere you‘ve eaten that you kinda like to brag about or drop into conversation? 

When I went traveling as a teenager on a school choir trip (nerd alert!) we went to a food court where just about anything could be ordered, including “Pig’s Organ Soup”.  Heart, lungs, kidneys, hooves, and many more even less seemingly edible parts of a pig.  I didn’t order it, but it’s a good appetite-killer at a dinner party of less-adventurous eaters – or a conversation starter at a dinner party of vegetarians.

What do you fix for yourself, or where do you go to eat, when it’s just you on your own?

Most of the time, living in self-imposed-destitution, I’m a big fan of making food stretch as far as it will go.  Now that it’s getting cold, that means a massive pot of soup, hopefully with some chilli and spices in it to keep the bones warm.

What’s one of your favourite food memories from your childhood? 

We would visit my extended family in Canada for Christmas every now and then, and my Nana, who had been strictly ‘no-lollies-ever’ with her own children, was quite happy watch us get high on sugar and food colouring.  She had a ‘lolly-tree’: a small, 10-inch tall Christmas tree made out of twigs, which we then stuck gumdrops to to make a multicoloured sugar-sparkling vision.  It was very pretty, until our regular trips to sneak “just one” had stripped the tree back to it’s naked twig state.
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i should tell you archives:

Coco Solid (April 19)
Watercolours (March 22)
Jeremy Toy, She’s So Rad (March 14)
Hera and Jed (March 7)
Eva Prowse (March 1)
Jan Hellriegel (February 21)
Dear Time’s Waste (February 14)
Flip Grater (February 7)
Tourettes (January 31)
Anna Coddington (January 24)